How Does Glaucoma Affect Vision

How Does Glaucoma Affect Vision

Glaucoma is a disorder in which the optic nerve of your eye is damaged. Over time, it worsens. It’s frequently linked to an increase in intraocular pressure. Glaucoma is a disease that runs in families. It is frequently not discovered until later in life. Intraocular pressure, or the pressure inside your eye, can harm your optic nerve, which sends images to your brain. Glaucoma can cause permanent vision loss or perhaps total blindness within a few years if the damage increases.

The majority of persons with glaucoma do not experience any early signs or pain.

Visual Symptoms Reported by Patients with Glaucoma

Glaucoma vision loss has typically been termed as “peripheral vision loss.” By asking patients precise detailed questions about how they see, we hoped to improve our clinical understanding of the visual symptoms induced by glaucoma.

Patients with varied types and stages of glaucoma who were clinically diagnosed were included in the study. All were given a thorough eye examination, which included Octopus visual field testing. If a patient had other ocular disorders that affected their vision, such as cornea, lens, or retina pathologies, these were ruled out. Patients were asked to fill out an oral survey on their visual complaints. We looked at the visual symptoms that glaucoma patients experienced and compared the severity of visual field loss to the visual symptoms they reported.

Ninety-nine patients responded to the survey. Primary open-angle glaucoma was diagnosed in the majority of patients (76 percent). All patients, including those with early or intermediate glaucoma, reported a need for additional light and hazy vision as the most common symptoms. Patients with larger field loss (Octopus mean defect >+9.4 dB) were more likely to have trouble seeing objects to one or both sides, as if looking through filthy glasses, and trouble distinguishing boundaries and colours.

What Does Vision Look Like With Glaucoma?

The following are the most common visual complaints described by glaucoma patients:

  • More light is required.
  • Vision is blurry.
  • Recognizing glare
  • Peripheral vision impairment
  • Contrast is difficult to distinguish.

How Long Does It Take For Glaucoma To Affect Vision?

Glaucoma takes about 10-15 years to progress from early damage to ultimate blindness if left untreated. It takes 15 years to progress from a 21-25 mmHg IOP to a 25-30 mmHg IOP, seven years to progress from a 25-30 mmHg IOP to a pressure greater than 30 mmHg, and three years to progress from a pressure greater than 30 mmHg IOP.

Does Glaucoma Cause Blurry Vision?

The typical understanding of glaucoma sufferers’ vision loss as loss of peripheral vision is not accurate. The most prevalent symptoms described by glaucoma patients were a need for more light and impaired vision.

How Can I Improve My Vision With Glaucoma?

These suggestions may aid in the management of high eye pressure or the promotion of eye health.

  • Maintain a balanced diet. A nutritious diet can help you stay healthy, but it won’t stop your glaucoma from getting worse.
  • Exercise in a safe manner.
  • Caffeine should be consumed in moderation.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Sleeping with your head raised is a good idea.
  • Take the medication as directed.

Summary

Glaucoma cannot be prevented. However, if you catch it early enough, you can reduce your chance of eye injury. Maintain a regular eye exam schedule. The earlier your doctor detects glaucoma symptoms, the sooner you can begin treatment. Every 3 to 5 years, all adults should get their eyes tested for glaucoma. Get a full eye checkup from an eye doctor every 1 to 2 years if you’re over 40 and have a family history of the condition. If you have diabetes or are at risk for other eye illnesses, you may need to visit more frequently.

Best Glaucoma Specialist in Pune

Annual comprehensive eye exams with dilatation are the most effective strategy to avoid glaucoma. Your doctor will evaluate your eyesight and eye health during your eye exam. Make an appointment with DLEI this month for an eye checkup with dilation to prevent glaucoma and maintain your eyesight.

Is Glaucoma hereditary

Is Glaucoma hereditary?

Glaucoma is a disease that can affect anyone. Certain populations, however, are more vulnerable than others. People who are at high risk for glaucoma should see a doctor right once for a full eye checkup, which should include eye dilation. Based on the results of this eye health screening, your eye doctor will inform you how often you should have follow-up checks.

Glaucoma: What is Your Genetic Risk?

Glaucoma can strike people of all ages. Glaucoma in children and young people is usually inherited as a Mendelian autosomal dominant or recessive trait, whereas glaucoma in older adults has a more complicated inheritance pattern. Glaucoma with an early beginning is uncommon, but adult-onset glaucoma is more prevalent. There are two main types of glaucoma: open-angle and closed-angle. Family history of these types of glaucoma increases an individual’s risk of developing glaucoma.

Is Open-Angle Glaucoma Hereditary?

Open-angle glaucoma is the most prevalent kind of glaucoma, accounting for approximately 90% of all cases. Open-angle glaucoma is inherited; people with a glaucoma family history are four to nine times more likely to get the disease. It is critical to inform your ophthalmologist as soon as possible if you have a family history of glaucoma. This knowledge can assist ophthalmologists in spotting early signs of glaucoma and taking the required actions to treat and slow it down.

Is the closed-angle glaucoma genetic?

Closed-angle glaucoma is rarer than open-angle glaucoma, and it usually develops suddenly. It is still genetic, despite being a less prevalent variety of glaucoma. Because closed-angle glaucoma usually develops abruptly and without warning, it’s crucial to know what it looks like and what to do if you start experiencing symptoms. To avoid vision loss, closed-angle glaucoma usually necessitates early treatment.

Summary

Closed-angle glaucoma is rarer than open-angle glaucoma, and it usually develops suddenly. It is still genetic, despite being a less prevalent variety of glaucoma. Because closed-angle glaucoma usually develops abruptly and without warning, it’s crucial to know what it looks like and what to do if you start experiencing symptoms. To avoid vision loss, closed-angle glaucoma usually necessitates early treatment.

Are You at Risk for Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is usually asymptomatic until it progresses to the point that patients notice a difficulty with their peripheral vision (side vision). Regular vision tests are essential for monitoring the health of your eyes, particularly if you have a family history of ocular disease. Our experts at DLEI can help you whether you have glaucoma now or have a family history of it.

Frequently Asked Question - FAQs About Glaucoma

Frequently Asked Question (FAQs) About Glaucoma

Glaucoma refers to a group of eye diseases that cause damage to the optic nerve (the bundle of nerve fibers that transmits information from the eye to the brain), resulting in vision loss and possibly blindness. Optic nerve damage is most commonly associated with high eye pressure; however, it can occur with normal or even lower than normal eye pressure.

People with a family history of glaucoma, high blood pressure, or high blood sugar levels may be at a higher risk of developing the disease. Adjusting to life with glaucoma can be difficult, as it is with any illness or medical condition. Glaucoma, on the other hand, does not have to take over your life. As with any medical diagnosis, if you get diagnosed with glaucoma, it may raise several concerns.

In this article, you will get answers you seek to questions in your mind regarding glaucoma and your overall eyesight.

What Is Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a broad term that encompasses a range of eye disorders that cause damage to the optic nerve. It is the most common type of optic nerve damage that results in vision loss. In most cases, fluid accumulates in the front of the eye. This extra fluid puts pressure on the eyes, gradually causing optic nerve damage. It is known as intraocular pressure (IOP), also known as eye pressure. Some people with normal eye pressure develop glaucoma. Glaucoma can cause severe and lasting loss of vision and blindness if left unchecked or poorly controlled.

Glaucoma is a common age-related eye condition. It is the second leading cause of blindness in the world, after cataracts. Glaucoma can affect people of all races and genders, but the risk increases as one get older. African Americans and Latinos are much more likely than other races to develop glaucoma, and they catch the disease at a younger age. Asian and Inuit populations are also predisposed to a type of glaucoma known as angle-closure glaucoma. People who have diabetes are twice as likely to develop glaucoma.

Now let’s get to the questions you may have on glaucoma and get some answers to them.

Frequently Asked Question (FAQs) About Glaucoma

You will have achieved your goal when you recognize that the more people are aware of glaucoma, the better equipped they will be to find treatment for this condition. As a result, with the answers to frequently asked questions provided below, you can find the assistance you require to preserve your vision.

  1. How common is glaucoma?

Glaucoma remains a common eye problem, which affects people over a certain age. Studies suggest that over three million Americans get diagnosed with glaucoma. On the global scale, glaucoma finds itself second, after cataract, to be the leading cause of blindness or vision loss.

  1. Who might get glaucoma?

Glaucoma can affect people of all races and genders, but the risk rises with age. African Americans and Latinos remain far more likely than other races to develop glaucoma, and they can acquire it sooner than others. Angle-closure glaucoma is a type of glaucoma that affects Asian and Inuit populations. People with diabetes are twice as likely as non-diabetics to develop glaucoma.

  1. What are the different types of glaucoma?

There are two main types of glaucoma – open-angle and closed-angle – that affect most people. However, other types of glaucoma include normal-tension glaucoma and congenital glaucoma. The causes may differ, and therefore the treatment method may vary as well.

Read more: What Is Glaucoma? Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, Surgery & Prevention

 

  1. How does glaucoma damage my eyes?

Glaucoma is harmful to vision because it damages the optic nerve. Everything you see gets transmitted to the brain via the optic nerve. Any damage to it reduces the quality and quantity of information your brain receives, resulting in vision loss.

  1. What are the stages of glaucoma?

The different stages of glaucoma determine the severity of the condition, and the diagnosis and treatment get administered accordingly. Primarily, there are three stages of glaucoma – mild or early-stage glaucoma, moderate-stage glaucoma, and severe-stage glaucoma.

  1. Who is at risk of glaucoma?

Glaucoma is the most common cause of blindness in African Americans and Hispanics. African Americans have three times the rate of glaucoma as Caucasians and four times the rate of blindness. Glaucoma is fifteen times more likely to cause blindness in African Americans than Caucasians between 45 and 64 years. People over the age of 60 are at a higher risk of developing glaucoma than those under 60 years.

  1. How do eye doctors check for glaucoma?

Simple eye pressure tests and a microscopic examination will usually alert your doctor to any problems that may indicate glaucoma. If glaucoma is suspected, a nerve fiber analyzer may get used to determine whether the optic nerve has been damaged, as well as a visual field test to determine the amount of peripheral vision loss.

  1. How do eye doctors treat glaucoma?

There are several effective glaucoma treatments available that can slow the progression and damage to the optic nerve. Prescription medications or eye drops are among the treatments available. In some cases, you may require Laser Trabeculoplasty to open drainage holes in the eye, allowing fluid to flow more freely and potentially eliminating the need for daily eye drops.

  1. How to treat glaucoma with medicines?

Eye drops and, in rare cases, pills are the most commonly used treatments for glaucoma. Eye drops get classified into several types, but all get used to either reduce the amount of fluid (aqueous humor) in the eye or improve its outward flow. Doctors will sometimes prescribe a combination of eye drops. Based on the individual case of glaucoma, medical history, and current medication regimen, a doctor can determine which medications are best suited for a patient.

  1. How to treat glaucoma with laser surgery?

Although laser surgery can help control glaucoma symptoms, no treatments are currently available to cure the disease. Several laser surgery techniques can aid in draining fluid from the eyes or reduce the amount of fluid produced. These techniques help to maintain normal eye pressure and reduce the risk of further optic nerve damage.

Read More: What Are The Causes Of Glaucoma?

  1. How to treat glaucoma with surgery?

If medications are ineffective or the patient is unable to tolerate them, a doctor may recommend surgery. The goal of surgery is usually to reduce the pressure inside the eye. Trabeculoplasty, filtering surgery, and drainage implants are all possible interventions.

  1. How to live with glaucoma?

When you are diagnosed with glaucoma, you might face lifelong treatment, regular checkups, and the possibility of progressive vision loss. Meeting and talking with other people who have glaucoma can be very beneficial, and there are many online support groups and resources available. Find out about local groups and meeting times by contacting hospitals and eye care centers in your area.

  1. How to take eye drop medications?

Prescription eye drops are the most commonly used treatment for glaucoma. It reduces the pressure in your eye and helps to protect your optic nerve. They cannot cure glaucoma or reverse vision loss, but they can prevent it from worsening. If your doctor prescribes eye drops, you must use them daily. Depending on the medication, you may need to take it once, twice, or up to four times per day.

  1. Can glaucoma be cured?

Glaucoma is incurable, and you cannot restore lost vision. It is possible to slow or stop further vision loss with medication, laser treatment, and surgery. Because open-angle glaucoma cannot get cured, it must get monitored for the rest of one’s life. The first step toward preserving your vision is a diagnosis.

  1. What is the latest treatment for glaucoma?

There are numerous glaucoma surgery options available. However, only use one if your doctor recommends it. Your eye doctor or ophthalmologist can usually treat glaucoma with prescribed eye drops and medication.

Read More: What Is Glaucoma? Diagnosis And Treatment Options

  1. How can glaucoma be treated permanently?

While there is no permanent cure for glaucoma, your eye doctor can treat its symptoms and make sure the condition does not worsen. If your glaucoma condition gets detected early, the treatment prescribed by your doctor can slow down its progression.

  1. Can glaucoma be cured if caught early?

In general, you can avoid glaucoma-related blindness with early detection. Patients with glaucoma may go undiagnosed because they exhibit few to no symptoms. As a result, if detected and treated early, your eye doctor may be able to prevent permanent vision loss and blindness.

  1. Is there hope for glaucoma patients?

Early detection and treatment remain vital for patients with glaucoma. If your eye doctor can diagnose and treat your glaucoma early, they can prevent its progression and avoid blindness or vision loss altogether. So, yes, there is hope for glaucoma patients. Remember, regular eye checkups can help you detect any eye-related condition.

  1. How can I lower my eye pressure fast?

Your eye doctor may prescribe eye drops to lower your eye pressure quickly. However, if you want your eyes to remain healthy over a longer time, you need to follow a few natural methods. You can start by eating a wholesome diet, regular exercise, staying hydrated, and reducing your screen time to ensure your eyes have normal pressure.

  1. How long does it take to go blind from glaucoma?

Fortunately, for the vast majority of patients, the answer is no. Blindness does occur due to glaucoma, but it is a relatively rare occurrence in approximately 5% of glaucoma patients. However, vision impairment is more common, affecting around 10% of patients. The vast majority of glaucoma patients will get stabilized with proper treatment and follow-up. Working with your doctor to manage your glaucoma will result in a positive outcome.

  1. What foods to avoid if you have glaucoma?

A high trans fatty acid diet can cause damage to the optic nerve. To avoid worsening your glaucoma, avoid foods such as cookies, cakes, and donuts, as well as fried items such as French fries and stick margarine.

  1. What should I avoid if I have glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a silent thief of sight. The symptoms may not appear before the disease’s effects are felt. Regular eye exams are essential for detecting and controlling glaucoma. However, there are some things you can do to reduce the onset and impacts of glaucoma, such as limiting your intake of trans fat, saturated fat, caffeine, and simple carbohydrates.

Considering the questions and concerns you may have regarding glaucoma, this article has tried to address as many as possible. You can take this knowledge as a way to get your eyes checked regularly and seek treatment at the earliest.

Conclusion

Glaucoma is a common eye condition that affects people as they age. It occurs when the fluid does not drain from your eyes, increasing eye pressure and the risk of optic nerve damage. In the early stages of glaucoma, you may not find any symptoms, but it can lead to vision loss. If you get your eyes checked regularly, it can aid in the detection of any changes that will allow your eye doctor to begin treatment, usually with eye drops. Eye drops have the potential to slow or stop the progression of the disease.

Remember only to reach out to the most advanced Eye-care Hospital for your Glaucoma Treatment if you have other health issues or even otherwise. The experts at Dada Laser Eye Institute will guide you through the entire process. The doctors explain the risks involved and share their knowledge about glaucoma before and after your treatment.

Glaucoma - Diagnosis And Treatment Options

What Is Glaucoma? Diagnosis And Treatment Options

Glaucoma causes optic nerve damage due to fluid buildup in the eye. If not treated, this eye pressure can permanently impair vision. Glaucoma may be the world’s second leading cause of blindness. Eyedrops, laser treatments, and surgeries can all help to slow vision loss and save your sight. The most common type, open-angle glaucoma, manifests slowly and is difficult to detect. An ophthalmologist, on the other hand, may identify changes during an eye exam. Glaucoma has no cure, but treatment can slow or stop its progression.

Glaucoma is often referred to as the “silent thief of sight” because most types cause no pain or symptoms until noticeable vision loss occurs. As a result, glaucoma frequently goes undetected until the optic nerve is irreversibly damaged. Though the exact cause of glaucoma is unknown, several factors can increase one’s risk. Age, ethnicity, family history, racial background, and various medical conditions such as short-sightedness and diabetes are among them. It affects people of all ages, but it primarily affects adults.

In this article, you will learn more about glaucoma, its treatment options, and how glaucoma gets diagnosed.

What Is Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a broad term that refers to a group of eye disorders that cause damage to the optic nerve. It is the most common type of optic nerve damage that results in vision loss. In most cases, fluid accumulates in the front of the eye. This extra fluid puts pressure on the eyes, gradually causing optic nerve damage. It is known as intraocular pressure (IOP), also known as eye pressure. Some people with normal eye pressure develop glaucoma.

In most cases, glaucoma remains associated with higher-than-normal intraocular pressure, a condition known as ocular hypertension. However, it can also happen when the intraocular pressure (IOP) is regular. Glaucoma, if left untreated or poorly controlled, can cause permanent and irreversible vision loss and blindness.

Read More: What Is Glaucoma? Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, Surgery & Prevention

Glaucoma Diagnosis

An ophthalmologist (eye doctor) can usually detect people who are at risk for glaucoma (for example, because of a narrow drainage angle or increased intraocular pressure) before nerve damage occurs. The doctor can also diagnose glaucoma in patients who already have nerve damage or visual field loss. The following tests, all of which are painless, could be included in this evaluation.

Your doctor will go over your medical history and perform a thorough eye examination. They may conduct a variety of tests. Here is the list of Glaucoma Diagnosis procedures:

  • Tonometry

Tonometry measures the tone or firmness of the surface of the eye to determine its pressure. This test can get performed using many tonometers, the most common of which is the applanation tonometer. The tonometer’s sensor gets placed against the front surface of the eye. It gets done after numbing the eye with anesthetic eye drops. The higher the pressure reading, the firmer the tone of the eye’s surface.

  • Ophthalmoscopy

Ophthalmoscopy is an examination in which the doctor looks directly into the eye through the pupil (the opening in the colored iris) using a handheld device, a head-mounted device, or an appropriate lens and the slit lamp. The optic nerve or the optic disc at the back of the eye gets examined during this procedure. This method can detect damage to the optic nerve, known as cupping of the disc. Increased intraocular pressure can cause cupping, which is an indentation of the optical disc. As an increase in optic nerve cupping over time, asymmetry in the degree of optic nerve cupping between the two eyes can be a sign of glaucoma.

  • Perimetry

An ophthalmologist performs a visual field test to assess the patient’s peripheral (side) vision. The patient looks straight ahead while the doctor places a light spot in various locations around the edge of their sight. It aids in the creation of a map of what the person can see.

  • Gonioscopy

The eyes get numbed with anesthetic drops before a particular contact lens with mirrors gets placed on the eyes’ surface. The mirrors allow the doctor to see the inside of the eye from various angles. The goal of this test is to look at the eye’s drainage angle and drainage area. The doctor can use this procedure to determine whether the drainage angle is open or narrow. They can also look for any other abnormalities, like increased pigment in the drainage angle or any long-standing damage to the drainage angle from prior inflammation or injury.

  • Pachymetry

Pachymetry is a method of measuring the thickness of the cornea. After numbing your eyes with anesthetic eye drops, the doctor uses the pachymeter tip to touch the cornea (front surface of the eye). The measurement of intraocular pressure has been shown in studies to be affected by corneal thickness. Thicker corneas may give falsely high readings, while thinner corneas may give falsely low interpretations.

  • Visual Field Testing

The visual field testing method is another diagnostic tool to detect glaucoma. It maps the visual fields to identify any early or late signs of glaucomatous optic nerve damage. Visual fields get measured by a computer one eye at a time to detect and track glaucoma. One eye is covered, and the patient rests their chin in a bowl-like device. Lights of varying intensity and size get projected at random around the inside of the bowl. When light is detected, the patient presses a button. This diagnostic procedure generates a computerized map of the visual field, highlighting the areas where each eye can and cannot see.

Read More: What Are The Causes Of Glaucoma?

Glaucoma Treatment

You cannot reverse the effects of glaucoma. However, proper treatment and regular checkups can help the doctor slow or prevent vision loss, especially if the disease gets detected early. Glaucoma gets treated by lowering your intraocular pressure (intraocular pressure). Your treatment options may include prescription eye drops, oral medications, laser treatment, surgery, or a combination of any of these methods.

Because glaucoma causes irreversible vision loss, the ultimate goal of all of these treatment methods is to prevent vision loss. The good news is that glaucoma management can be effective if the disease gets diagnosed and treated early, and appropriate treatment ensures that no further sight loss due to this eye disease occurs.

  • Eyedrops

Prescription eye drops get frequently used to begin glaucoma treatment. These can help reduce eye pressure by improving the way fluid drains from your eye or decreasing the amount of fluid your eye produces. Depending on how low your eye pressure needs to be, you may require more than one of the eyedrops.

Your eye doctor may prescribe eyedrop medications. These medicines could include prostaglandins, beta-blockers, or alpha-adrenergic agonists. Or other medications like carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, rho kinase inhibitors, miotic or cholinergic. Because some of the eyedrop medication gets absorbed into your bloodstream, you might experience some unrelated side effects on your eyes.

  • Oral Medication

If eyedrops alone are ineffective in lowering your eye pressure, your doctor may prescribe an oral medication, usually a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. Frequent urination, tingling in the fingers and toes, depression, stomach upset, and kidney stones are all possible side effects.

  • Laser Surgery

If you have open-angle glaucoma, you may be able to benefit from laser trabeculoplasty. It gets completed in your doctor’s office. Your ophthalmologist will use a tiny laser beam to open clogged channels in the trabecular meshwork. It may take a few weeks for the full impact of this procedure to be felt. While the laser can supplement the use of eye drops, it cannot completely replace them. The effects of laser treatments vary, but they can last for up to five years. Some laser treatments are also reversible.

  • Glaucoma Surgery

Another option for lowering eye pressure is surgery. It is more invasive, but it achieves better eye pressure control more quickly than drops or lasers. Although surgery can help slow vision loss, it cannot restore lost vision or cure glaucoma. There are many different types of glaucoma surgeries, and your eye doctor may recommend one over another depending on the specific type and severity of your glaucoma.

You’ll need to see your doctor for follow-up exams after your procedure. Additionally, if your eye pressure begins to rise or other changes occur in your eye, you may need to undergo additional procedures.

Conclusion

Successful glaucoma treatment requires collaboration between you and your doctor. Your glaucoma treatment will get prescribed by your ophthalmologist. It is your responsibility to use your eye drops according to your doctor’s instructions. Once you start taking glaucoma medications, your ophthalmologist will want to see you regularly. You should see your ophthalmologist about every 3–6 months. This can, however, vary depending on your treatment requirements.

While there is no cure for glaucoma, treatments can control eye pressure and prevent vision loss. Eye exams can detect the disease early and help you keep your sight. If you are at high risk for glaucoma, ask your eye doctor how frequently you should get screened. If you have glaucoma, you must use daily eye drops as directed. You can also inquire with your provider about laser treatments and surgical procedures. You can prevent glaucoma from worsening and causing irreversible vision loss or blindness if you take proper care of it.

Remember only to reach out to the most advanced eye-care hospital for your glaucoma problem if you have other health issues or even otherwise. The experts at Dada Laser Eye Institute will guide you through the entire process. The doctors explain the risks involved and share their knowledge about glaucoma before and after your treatment.

What Are The Causes Of Glaucoma

What Are The Causes Of Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a condition in which the fluid pressure within the eye rises. It can damage the optic nerve and cause vision loss if not treated. Glaucoma is a fairly common condition. It is most likely to strike white people over 60 years of age and black and Hispanic people over 40 years.

The most common type, open-angle glaucoma, manifests slowly and is difficult to detect. An ophthalmologist, on the other hand, may identify changes during an eye exam. Glaucoma has no cure, but treatment can slow or stop its progression.

This article will discuss the causes of glaucoma and the signs and symptoms so that you can be better prepared.

What Is Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a condition in which there is an increase in intraocular pressure that damages the optic nerve. The aqueous humor is a clear fluid found in the front of the eye. This fluid both nourishes and shapes the eyes. This fluid gets constantly produced by your eyes and gets drained away via a drainage system.

Glaucoma causes the fluid in the eye to drain too slowly. When this occurs, fluid accumulates, and the pressure inside the eye rises. If this pressure does not get managed, it can damage the optic nerve and other parts of the eye, resulting in vision loss. Glaucoma typically affects both eyes, though one eye may be affected more severely than the other. If detected early, you may be able to avoid further vision loss.

What Are First Signs Of Glaucoma?

There are two common types of glaucoma. You will find primary open-angle glaucoma to be the most common type of glaucoma. Except for gradual vision loss, it has no signs or symptoms. As a result, it’s critical to have yearly comprehensive eye exams so your ophthalmologist, or eye specialist, can track any changes in your vision.

Acute angle-closure glaucoma, also known as narrow-angle glaucoma, is a life-threatening condition. Consult your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • severe ocular pain
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • eye redness
  • sudden vision disturbances
  • observing colored rings surrounding lights
  • unexpected blurred vision

Read more: What Is Glaucoma? Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, Surgery & Prevention

What Are Causes of Glaucoma?

Glaucoma can occur without a known cause. But it can get influenced by a variety of factors. Intraocular eye pressure is the most important one. Your eyes produce a fluid known as aqueous humor, which feeds them. This liquid travels to the front of the eye via the pupil. The solution leaves the eye through a drainage canal located between the iris and cornea in a healthy optic.

The drainage canals become clogged with microscopic deposits as a result of glaucoma. Because the fluid has nowhere to go, it accumulates in the eye. This extra fluid puts strain on the eyes. This increased eye pressure can eventually damage the optic nerve, resulting in glaucoma.

Glaucoma causes depend on the type of glaucoma.

  • What causes open-angle glaucoma?

Fluid moves too slowly through the spongy tissue in the opening where the iris and cornea meet in people with open-angle glaucoma. It causes fluid to accumulate in your eye, increasing the pressure inside your eye.

When the pressure inside your eye becomes too high, experts believe it can damage the optic nerve and cause vision loss. Lowering eye pressure has been shown in studies to help prevent vision loss from glaucoma, which is why it is critical to control the pressure inside your eyes.

  • What causes normal-tension glaucoma?

Your optic nerve can be damaged and cause vision loss even if you do not have high eye pressure. It gets referred to as normal-tension or low-tension glaucoma.

Experts are unsure why this occurs, but it could be because your optic nerve is more sensitive than most people’s. Even if the pressure in your eye is normal in this case, lowering it can help to slow or prevent further damage to your eyes.

  • What causes angle-closure glaucoma?

The outer edge of the iris blocks the opening where the iris and cornea meet in angle-closure glaucoma. When this happens, the fluid in your eye cannot drain at all. It is a medical situation that requires immediate attention.

Angle-closure glaucoma can cause the following unexpected symptoms:

  • Extensive eye pain
  • Stomach ache (nausea)
  • The appearance of a red eye
  • Hazy vision

If you experience any of these symptoms, contact your doctor or an emergency room right away.

  • What causes congenital glaucoma?

Congenital glaucoma occurs when a baby is born with an eye problem that causes fluid to drain more slowly than usual. The good news is that if a child with congenital glaucoma receives surgery soon after being diagnosed, they have a good chance of developing healthy vision.

Conclusion

While there is no cure for glaucoma, treatments can control eye pressure and prevent vision loss. Eye exams can detect the disease early and help you keep your sight. If you are at high risk for glaucoma, ask your eye doctor how frequently you should get screened. If you have glaucoma, you must use daily eye drops as directed. Inquire with your healthcare provider or your ophthalmologist about laser treatments and surgery options as well. You can prevent glaucoma from worsening and causing irreversible vision loss or blindness if you take proper care of it.

Remember only to reach out to the most advanced eye-care hospitals and clinics for your glaucoma problem if you have other health issues or even otherwise. The experts at Dada Laser Eye Institute will guide you through the entire process. The doctors explain the risks involved and share their knowledge about glaucoma before and after your treatment. You can get in touch with the experts and get proper consultation by giving us a call at (+91) 992 299 5549 or visit our website.