Is Glaucoma hereditary

Glaucoma is a disease that can affect anyone. Certain populations, however, are more vulnerable than others. People who are at high risk for glaucoma should see a doctor right once for a full eye checkup, which should include eye dilation. Based on the results of this eye health screening, your eye doctor will inform you how often you should have follow-up checks.

Glaucoma: What is Your Genetic Risk?

Glaucoma can strike people of all ages. Glaucoma in children and young people is usually inherited as a Mendelian autosomal dominant or recessive trait, whereas glaucoma in older adults has a more complicated inheritance pattern. Glaucoma with an early beginning is uncommon, but adult-onset glaucoma is more prevalent. There are two main types of glaucoma: open-angle and closed-angle. Family history of these types of glaucoma increases an individual’s risk of developing glaucoma.

Is Open-Angle Glaucoma Hereditary?

Open-angle glaucoma is the most prevalent kind of glaucoma, accounting for approximately 90% of all cases. Open-angle glaucoma is inherited; people with a glaucoma family history are four to nine times more likely to get the disease. It is critical to inform your ophthalmologist as soon as possible if you have a family history of glaucoma. This knowledge can assist ophthalmologists in spotting early signs of glaucoma and taking the required actions to treat and slow it down.

Is the closed-angle glaucoma genetic?

Closed-angle glaucoma is rarer than open-angle glaucoma, and it usually develops suddenly. It is still genetic, despite being a less prevalent variety of glaucoma. Because closed-angle glaucoma usually develops abruptly and without warning, it’s crucial to know what it looks like and what to do if you start experiencing symptoms. To avoid vision loss, closed-angle glaucoma usually necessitates early treatment.

Summary

Closed-angle glaucoma is rarer than open-angle glaucoma, and it usually develops suddenly. It is still genetic, despite being a less prevalent variety of glaucoma. Because closed-angle glaucoma usually develops abruptly and without warning, it’s crucial to know what it looks like and what to do if you start experiencing symptoms. To avoid vision loss, closed-angle glaucoma usually necessitates early treatment.

Are You at Risk for Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is usually asymptomatic until it progresses to the point that patients notice a difficulty with their peripheral vision (side vision). Regular vision tests are essential for monitoring the health of your eyes, particularly if you have a family history of ocular disease. Our experts at DLEI can help you whether you have glaucoma now or have a family history of it.

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